Chaos – Mute Math

3 Nov

What makes a song a ‘Christian’ song? Is it something as simple as mentioning Jesus in a positive light? Is it staying away from adult themes and coarse language? Or is it something more fundamental? Is it  the worldview the picture paints?

Surely the mention of Jesus is not enough. We’ve heard enough sermons about a good man called Christ to know that invoking his name can actually mean very little. Surely the absence of certain words or themes is not enough either because no matter how comprehensive our list and how fine our comb idolatrous ideas will get through because they always have a basis in Gospel truth.

So what about a more fundamental approach? What about looking at the world view a song paints, analysing the imaginative world it transports us into and asking ‘Does the Gospel fit in here?’

That’s what I was asked to do in my latest college assignment, to critically read a piece of popular culture that promotes an authentically Christian world view. My chosen piece of art? Chaos, by Mute Math.

To read my full analysis check out my paper in the ‘papers’ section of this site. But for now let me offer a few short thoughts.

The song Chaos can be considered a Christian song because it does two things. Firstly it calls life and human beings as they really are. Seeking control but finding little. It paints a life of let downs and ruinous self-dependence. Secondly it points to hope, a  rock or anchor in the stormy seas of life. It promises there is someone  we can depend on.

While it doesn’t go much further than that its at least a start. It’s not propaganda, it’s art. In the world created by Chaos the Gospel makes sense because the world is much like reality we face.

Here’s the song and here’s a fuller critique.

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One Response to “Chaos – Mute Math”

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. 1 Timothy 1 « saintbeagle - 12/11/2010

    […] academia (after the refreshing excursion through pop-culture critiquing of The Prestige and Mute Math) with the exciting title, “Write a critical, exegetical and contextual analysis of 1 Timothy […]

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